My Name is Richard Howe, and I’m NOT a Mormon

No doubt the flood of commercials of everyday people telling us that they’re Mormons is an attempt (understandably enough) to massage the public mindset and attitude about Mormonism in anticipation of Mitt Romney’s nomination for the Republican candidate for President. I’m not suggesting that he will undoubtedly be the nominee. I would say, however, that, all other things being equal, his being a Mormon is less relevant to his qualifications to be the President than many other factors. I would take a Mormon Mitt Romney over a Baptist Jimmy Carter any day of the week.

What bothers me, especially in light of the row over Continue reading

It’s Worse Than I Thought

Over the past year or so, a colleague of mine has been telling me of his concerns about how Presuppositionalism (or some watered-down version thereof) infuses the thinking of certain popular Young-Earth Creationists if not Young-Earth Creationism in general. Though he himself is an Old-Earth creationist, he came to me with his concerns because, being a Classical Apologist, he knows that I am both a classical apologist and a Young-Earth Creationist. Apparently we are a small group.
Tonight I had the opportunity to visit a local Continue reading

The Ant and the Grasshopper: American Liberal Style

I saw an earlier version of this during the Clinton administration. Here’s the updated version.

The story of the ant and the grasshopper. But this one is a little different …… Two Different Versions ….. Two Different Morals
OLD VERSION:
The ant works hard in the withering heat all summer long, building his house and laying up supplies for the winter. The grasshopper thinks the ant is a fool, and laughs and dances and plays the summer away. Come winter, the ant is warm and well-fed. The grasshopper has no food or shelter, so he dies out in the cold.
MORAL OF THE OLD STORY: Be responsible for yourself!
MODERN VERSION:
The ant works hard in the withering heat and Continue reading

Some Thoughts About Some Thoughts

A friend of mind recently posted on the internet a few thoughts.

Tim Wildmon, (Don’s son and as a function of “divine right of kings theology” crown prince of the American Family Association) was recently raving about President Obama suggesting that some people had made enough money. This enraged Wildmon, he was incensed that someone should suggest the he could ever make enough money. Tim Wildom and Gordon Gecko agree, in contrast to the Bible: Continue reading

Forty-Five Years Ago

I suppose that as long as there are March 3rds, I’ll do at least one blog a year. It seems I’ll never forget the date of March 3, 1966. Because of this, I feel compelled to re-post these musings.

(re-posted from last year and the year before and the year before, mutatis mutandis) I remember being in the our front yard one afternoon after school on Marwood Dr. in Jackson, MS. One of my older brothers had had his telescope out looking at the cloud formations. It began to rain so my brother scooped up his telescope and he and I ran into the house. I sat down to watch television. It was about 4:30. We had a window over the kitchen sink that looked out into our carport. Suddenly, the rain and wind became so intense that the view from the window became obscured even though it was protected by the carport ceiling. Then the power went off. That was always frightening to a child, even in the afternoon. Then another brother came running into the den area where we were with our mom. (My youngest brother had been asleep on the couch.) Dad was away on one of his out-of-state business trips. My brother was yelling, “It’s a tornado! It’s a tornado!” None of us knew exactly what to do. The kids wanted to just jump in the car and flee but none of us knew exactly where to flee to. Before we had time to really gain our composure (being only 10 years old, perhaps I was the only one who was actually panicked) the storm had passed. There was an errie calm that set in as we began to hear the scream of sirens. The tornado had passed at least a statue mile from our house and we sustained no damage. It was not so for the Candlestick Park Shopping Center. Some sources say 13; others say 19 were killed in the shopping center. More were killed as the tornado tracked eastward across other parts of Mississippi and Alabama. Over 300 were injured. After the twister devastated Candlestick Park, it hit a power sub-station (which is what made our power go off). It then followed along Cooper Road for several hundred yards and lifted up, skipping over downtown Jackson. Another brother of mine (I have four) watched the storm from his office window in a downtown sky-scraper (or what would pass as one in those days). The duration of the afternoon and into the night was filled with the sounds of cars rushing to take the injured to the hospital. Someone came to our door and asked if we had a thermos he could borrow to render aid to the rescue teams. We sat around our kitchen table listening to a transistor radio. I was a Beatle fan. I heard for the first time their new hit “Nowhere Man.” Needless to say, every time I heard that song for many years after, it always took me back to those eerie and frightening feelings of that day. Finally, in what seemed like forever, our power came back on at about 10:00 that evening. We all hugged. It was Thursday, March 3, 1966.

Is God Great or Isn’t He?

I recently heard a recording of a debate that Christopher Hitchens had with Jay Richards. During the exchange Hitchens made a comment to the effect that he regarded a particular person as arrogant because he claimed to speak in the name of God. His comment made me wonder why, if God is not great (as Hitchens’ book claims), it would be arrogant to claim to speak in his name. Why is it arrogant to speak in the name of someone who is not great? I suspect Hitchens’ reaction betrays an unconscious or dispositional knowledge that indeed not only does God exist, but He is great.

Forty-four Years Ago Today

It seems I’ll never foget the date of March 3, 1966. Because of this, I feel compelled to re-post these musings.

(re-posted from last year and the year before, mutatis mutandis) I remember being in the our front yard one afternoon after school on Marwood Dr. in Jackson, MS. One of my older brothers had had his telescope out looking at the cloud formations. It began to rain so my brother scooped up his telescope and he and I ran into the house. I sat down to watch television. It was about 4:30. We had Continue reading

With Pride

Usually people don’t like it when someone draws attention to himself. But there is one instance when it is not only acceptable, but I believe desirable. Today while I was in McDonald’s eating a hearty breakfast, I noticed an elderly couple. The man had a hat on which had on it what looked like some sort of military insignias together with the words “I served with pride.” It was clear to me that he was pointing out to anyone who would read his hat that he had honorably served in the United States armed services. Looking in his 80s, I wondered if he might have served in WWII. I always think of my father, Berton, who also served in the military. He was in the 94th infantry in the European theater in Checkoslovokia and later was re-called to Pussan, South Korea. If my dad were alive today, I would want him to wear his “I served with pride” had too. Thank you sir for you service to our country, and thank you for the pleasant reminded of my late father.